Candida. An Intractable problem?

Candida. An Intractable problem?

Candida is a common, often seemingly intractable, problem. Candida albicans is a normal inhabitant of the lower bowel and it is usually kept under control by the high pH values which are maintained by lactobacilli, another of the bowel’s inhabitants. Antibiotics are one class of drug which can upset the balance of the bowel flora by killing lactobacilli. This then allows the entry of other morbific bacteria thus reducing the pH value and providing the right conditions for the proliferation of yeasts, moulds and viruses, the most common of which is Candida albicans which can spread throughout the gastro-intestinal tract. However, Candida albicans can be found in other moist habitats including the skin and mucous membranes. SYSTEMIC CANDIDIASIS Dr Orion Truss; from Alabama, USA was the first to recognise the symptom picture of candidiasis and demonstrated that the spores of intestinal candida could enter the blood stream and cause ‘partial paralysis of the immune system’. Truss’s findings were varied but of particular interest was his finding that red blood cells lost their elasticity in the presence of Candida. He also noticed a distinct reduction in available potassium & phosphorus in blood infected with Candida. The combined effect of these is to restrict blood supply, particularly oxygen and nutrients, to vital organs with fine capilliaries such as the brain. Truss recognised the symptoms of emotional instability, poor concentration, defective memory, vertigo, headaches and depression as being directly related to brain function, and referred to them as ‘brain symptoms’ as opposed to mental or ‘neurotic symptoms’. The most common symptom picture of systemic candidiasis includes: Mind               Concentration; Difficult; Memory; Weakness Of; Confidence, Loss...